I Have Mice In My Shed, What Should I Do

Mice in your shed? How do you get rid of them?

Mice are a small scale rodent that can do large scale damage, left to their own devices can cause hundreds if not thousands of pounds worth of repairs. Our sheds are where a lot of us will store expensive garden machinery or items that we don’t use on a regular basis. This is ideal for mice as it offers them somewhere to hide without the risk of being disturbed.

So how do you keep them out? 

Mice can fit through a gap as small as 5mm, so blocking all the entrance points isn’t always an option. The best way to keep mice at bay is to make your shed as unattractive to a mouse as possible. The average shed is cluttered, full of cobwebs, and has some sort of food source inside. All of these things are ideal for a mouse to set up it’s home in your shed. 

Keeping your shed clean and clutter-free is the first port of call. This won’t stop mice from entering your shed but it will certainly put them off staying. Removing the clutter of old seedboxes, empty grow bags, and garden furniture that was used once on a sunny day in 2011, will take away potential hiding places for mice and will see them look to set up shop somewhere else.

If there’s machinery in your shed such as a lawnmower, then it’s obviously there to stay. In the summer the lawnmower will be in and out so it’s not a worry. However, come the winter months it’s a perfect place for mice to climb inside and bed down for the winter. This would be fine if they didn’t make their nests from the cabling inside your machine! The best way to overcome this problem is to start your lawnmower on a regular basis through the winter and remove it from the shed. This will not only disturb any mice looking to nest inside, but it’s also a great help to your lawnmower and you’ll find it starting easily for that first cut in spring. 

My shed is clean but I still have mice!

If your shed doesn’t offer shelter to a mouse then it must offer something else. 99% of the time it’s a food source. Now, we aren’t talking about a cheese burger and fries here, we’re talking about bird seed/nuts, compost, planting bulbs, failed seedlings and the list goes on. Anything that may offer a mouse some nutrition should be stored appropriately. Metal bins with lids are the only thing that is mouse proof, and although expensive the cost of a new lawnmower after a mouse infestation is far more harmful to your bank account. 

Another tip to keep the mice away is to keep any vegetation around your shed under control. As we mentioned before, mice are prey animals, so they often won’t venture into open spaces. Keep the plant growth around your shed to stop the mice from being able to gain easy access to your belonging. 

These simple steps go a long way to keeping those mice at bay and keeping your beloved shed pest free!

Mice in your shed? How do you get rid of them?

Mice are a small scale rodent that can do large scale damage, and left to their own devices can cause hundreds if not thousands of pounds worth of repairs. Our sheds are where a lot of us will store expensive garden machinary or items that we don’t use on a regular basis. This is ideal for mice as it offers them somewhere to hide with out the risk of being disturbed.

So how do you keep them out? 

Mice can fit through a gap as small as 5mm, so blocking all the entrance points isn’t always an option. The best way to keep mice at bay is to make your shed as unattractive to a mouse as possible. The average shed is cluttered, full of cobwebs and has some sort of food source inside. All of these things are ideal for a mouse to set up it’s home in your shed. 

Keeping your shed clean and clutter free is the first port of call. This won’t stop mice entering your shed but it will certainly put them off staying. Removing the clutter of old seed boxes, empty grow bags and garden furniture that was used once on a sunny day in 2011, will take away potential hiding places for mice and will see them look to set up shop somewhere else.

If there’s machinery in your shed such as a lawnmower, then it’s obviously there to stay. In the summer the lawnmower will be in and out so it’s not a worry. However, come the winter months its a perfect place for mice to climb inside and bed down for the winter. This would be fine if they didn’t make their nests from the cabling inside your machine! The best way to overcome this problem is to start your lawnmower on a regular basis through the winter an remove it from the shed. This will not only disturb any mice looking to nest inside, but it’s also a great help to your lawnmower and you’ll find it starting easily for that first cut in spring. 

My shed is clean but I still have mice!

If your shed doesn’t offer shelter to a mouse then it must offer something else. 99% of the time it’s a food source. Now, we aren’t talking about a cheese burger and fries here, we’re talking about bird seed/nuts, compost, planting bulbs, failed seedlings and the list goes on. Anything that may offer a mouse some nutrition should be stored appropriately. Metal bins with lids are the only thing that is mouse proof, and although expensive the cost of a new lawnmower after a mouse infestation is far more harmful to your bank account. 

Another tip to keep the mice away is to keep any vegetation around your shed under control. As we mentioned before, mice are prey animals, so they often won’t venture into open spaces. Keep the plant growth around your shed to stop the mice from being able to gain easy access to your belonging. 

These simple steps go a long way to keeping those mice at bay and keeping your beloved shed pest free!

Keep your shed clean and clutter free!

Mice like to get into areas that offer warmth and shelter. Keeping your shed clean and clutter free prevents mice being able to set up their home in your shed.

 

Remove and start any machinery in your shed on a regular basis!

Removing and starting your machinery on a regular basis will disturb any mice looking to cause damage and will also benefit your machine.

Remove any food sources!

Remove any sources of food that are easy to get to for a mouse. Use metal storage bins to prevent mice accessing your supplies

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